Thursday, May 2, 2013

blog every day in may: something I'm good at

Keeping up with blogging every day in May...

Today’s topic: Something you’re really good at or know a lot about.

Y’all, something I consider myself pretty good at is grammar. I taught standardized test prep during college so I had to be able to explain to smart-alecky high schoolers why their usage was incorrect. As much as I have loved joining the blogger world, sometimes I have to step away due to the grammatical errors. I want to correct people, but I don’t (pinky swear). Let me just get this post out of my system and maybe teach a few people a few things…

Possessives vs. Plural: If you have more than one of something, just use an S. I didn’t eat two cupcake’s. I ate three cupcakes. An apostrophe is used when something is “owned.” My cupcake’s icing was delicious. Lauren’s (possessive) pants are too tight from all of those cupcakes (plural) she has been eating.

There/Their/They’re: I see this a lot less than I thought I would. There (location or state of being) is my latte. Their (as in, those people) order took forever to make, so now I am late to work. They’re (short for “they are”) going to be mad that I didn’t bring them Starbucks, too.

Your/You’re: You’re is short for “you are,” as in you’re going to feel like an idiot if you never realized this rule was that simple. Aren’t you bummed that your readers haven’t corrected you yet?

Peek vs. Peak vs. Pique: If you are going to offer me a sneak peek of something on your blog, I hope it’s something I actually want to see. If you climbed a mountain, tell me all about getting to its peak so I can live vicariously through you. And if you find something worth looking in to, then it piqued your interest.

It’s/Its: It’s is short for “it is.” If you can’t replace the it’s with it is in a sentence, then no apostrophe. It’s always hilarious when my cat starts chasing its tail (yes, that should have been his, but bear with me).

Bear vs. Bare: Bare is lacking, like the bare walls of my beige office. Bear is like a brown grizzly, or used as a verb (as in, bear with me, or it hurt so badly I couldn’t bear it).

Accept vs. Except: Accept is to receive; except is used when you are making an exception. I will accept any flavor of cupcake except for coconut because I think it's gross.

One of the many things I am NOT good at: graphic design. But, I attempted to make a graphic in pic monkey to help show the differences at a glance. Not sure why it's blurry. Also, I left off pique. Oops...



These are just a few things I see often. Now, I am far from perfect: I added a disclaimer to my twitter bio that I rarely ever proofread my tweets, I use dashes and parenthesis all the time, and trying not to end sentences with a preposition is too much work! And, don't even get me started on spelling and typos! But, if I can prevent one blogger from making these mistakes over and over again, then I would consider this post a success.

{ETA: the biggest idiot award goes to me. I typed this in Word yesterday and copy/pasted it here. I changed the font and sizes and everything and in doing so, somehow ruined the spacing. My husband pointed that out to me. So, clearly, someone needs to teach me to format blogs correctly.}

What are you good at? I bet it is way cooler than grammar! 

6 comments:

  1. I'm pretty good about grammar too, and spelling things correctly. So that's why I always slap myself when I accidentally type your for you're. I know the correct usage, sometimes my fingers are too fast for my brain!

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  2. I LOVE people with good grammar!

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  3. Thank you for posting this. I hope loads of people read it at take something from what you've said. It's so frustrating to read badly constructed blog posts and facebook updates with apostrophe catastrophes and pluralisation violations!

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  4. Don't forget about then and than! I've seen this one so often lately on Facebook that it's making me crazy! Obviously you know the difference, but for readers: then is a time (and then we walked to the library) and than is a comparative adjective or adverb (that book is thicker than the bible). My secret to having acceptable grammar: READ!

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  5. I feel the same way!! You know what I see all the time that drives me CRAZY!?!? Then vs than. I feel like I hardly ever see the word "than" in the blogs I read. Everyone just seems to always use then. This is not something I've ever thought of as hard or confusing. I mean, it's even pronounced differently! But alas, I see it always.

    I also see a lot of picture captions that go something like this: "My husband and I dancing." It's really simple; just take away "my husband" and see if it makes sense! Would you caption it with just "I dancing"?? No! So it's not I, it's me! Sheesh! :)

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  6. I am still trying to teach my college students about they're/there/their and you're/your sheesh!

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I like comments and read them all but I'm not great about responding to them, so please don't be offended. I would much rather visit your blog instead!